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coprime

June 2017

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coprime: animated icon of a boy reading intensely and then shouting "But I don't want it to be over!!" (books)
Wednesday, March 4th, 2009 07:51 pm
Is it wrong that I always get incredibly excited whenever I find a Firefox extension that fixes some niggly behavior to how I like it? Today, it's the ability to permanently sort my bookmarks -- and I can specify which folders I want to sort and how! -- thanks to SortPlaces. Now if only there was an extension so I could easily create duplicate bookmarks (ideally with also telling me when I was about to do so), my day would be made.

The Best of the Spirit - Will Eisner
I figured something labelled "The Best of" would make for a good introduction to one of the most influential comics ever, and I was right! This was amazing. Just incredibly innovating and imaginative and good even when compared to current-day stuff. Not that everything today is good, but The Spirit manages to be unique even when compared to sixty years worth of comics. My favorite thing about The Spirit is the same thing I love about Mushishi. All the stories are focused on people in them, rather than on Eisner's cool idea or neat art or some other bell and whistle that exists to show off and doesn't actually help tell the story. (Something that is, sadly, not as common as I would like.)

God Save the Queen - Mike Carey
This was a gift from a friend, and she got it for me because I really like Lucifer, a different title by Mike Carey. And those sorts of reads are always a bit of a crapshoot, so it was nice that I did enjoy this, mostly because of the art. (Drug use, which isn't something I like to read about generally, features heavily, and I found the heroine unlikable until about two-thirds of the way into the story.) All the pages are painted by John Bolton and are surprisingly realistic yet pretty. I have a feeling that his art is an example of photo referencing done right, but I can't find anything to confirm that he does that. In any case, the art has a slight static quality due to the fact that it's painted and referenced, but it grew on me quickly as I read.

Mushishi v6 - Yuki Urushibara
Finally, a volume with stories that weren't made into episodes for the anime! Because, okay, I adored revisiting the stories as each volume came out, but having completely new material to read is wonderful. "The Chirping Shell" I found charming, and I dare others to find the idea of seashells chirping like birds anything other than charming. "The Hand that Pets the Night" was a surprisingly creepy horror story (surprising because I rarely classify Mushishi stories as horror). "Under the Snow" was nicely uplifting even as it dealt with sibling grief, although I had to reread a few scenes because I didn't realize they were flashbacks the first time. And "Banquet in the Farthest Field" was a neat exploration of the lives of mushishi.
coprime: animated icon of a boy reading intensely and then shouting "But I don't want it to be over!!" (books)
Sunday, June 29th, 2008 02:48 am
Haha, this has been the month of comic books for me. It's been great.

Scary Godmother: Ghoul's Out for Summer, by Jill Thompson: The art makes this comic. Story-wise, it's not bad. It's fun and it's cute, but I wouldn't love this book like I do if the art was only half as fantastic as it is. It's expressive and detailed without being cluttered, and Jill Thompson makes her characters come alive in her drawings. I want to watch the movie based on this series now. I've seen it before, but the CG characters in it failed to be even slightly interesting for me. I think, now that I can fill in the blanks from the comic, I'd like the movie if I were to see it again.

Blue Beetle v1: Shellshocked, by Keith Giffen (writer) and Cully Hammer (artist): I wish all superhero comics were like this, with family and friends and other interpersonal relationships being just as important in the story as whatever evil plot our hero has to foil.

PS238 v1-4, by Aaron Williams: Dude, I read all four volumes in two days and am now sad that I didn't buy volume five last time I was in the comic shop. This series is great! It's about an elementary school for metahuman children. And, oh, it's adorable and funny and occasionally heart-wrenching. Also, volume three makes much more sense when I've gotten to read the two books before it.
coprime: animated icon of a boy reading intensely and then shouting "But I don't want it to be over!!" (books)
Thursday, May 15th, 2008 10:12 pm
Mmm, I got to bake today and yesterday for the first time in what seems like forever. Both recipes (a type of peanut butter cookie with chocolate chips and a brownie with peanut butter chips and a shortbread bottom) were new recipes for me, and both were delicious successes!

Pride of Baghdad, by Brian K. Vaughan (writer) and Niko Henrichon (artist): The story is told from the point of view of four lions who escaped from the Baghdad Zoo when the US invaded in 2003. It's an...odd story for me. It's very politically charged, to the detriment of the story. It felt like Vaughan wanted to write something about the nature of freedom and Iraq and that entire mess and then structured the story around that, so that the message and ideas behind the story felt more important than the story itself.

Which isn't a bad or wrong way to go about writing something, it's just not what I like in my personal fiction reading. Also, if I'm going to read about politics, I prefer it to be via non-fiction. I think Vaughan succeeds (and succeeds in a big way) with what he was trying to do in Pride of Baghdad and Henrichin's art is gorgeous, so the book's a good book and a compelling read, just not quite for me.
coprime: animated icon of a boy reading intensely and then shouting "But I don't want it to be over!!" (books)
Thursday, April 24th, 2008 10:20 pm
Caste Waiting V1: The Lucky Road, by Linda Medley: This was just utterly delightful to read. The story's a fairy tale, and it's one of those where I read it quickly because it's fun but it didn't feel rushed. I like the art and the expressiveness of the faces. I'm going to go on a search tomorrow for the hardcover, which (I believe) collects volumes 1 and 2, since volume 2 is out of print.

How I Proposed to My Wife: An Alien Sex Story, by John Scalzi: This is a short story that Scalzi's offering as shareware. It's a very funny story and totally lives up to the awesomeness promised by its title. Also, I like the idea of shareware fiction.
coprime: animated icon of a boy reading intensely and then shouting "But I don't want it to be over!!" (books)
Sunday, March 16th, 2008 11:39 pm
I participated in the [livejournal.com profile] 50bookchallenge last year as a way of forcing myself to think about books after I'd read them. And it worked, but I realized I don't want to write up my feelings on every book I read. There's only so many ways to say "Hana-Kimi was enjoyable; Sano and Mizuki are still being boneheads about their feelings for each other" after all. So I'm doing something similar here but only for the books I want to say something about.

Postcards: True Stories that Never Happened, edited by Jason Rodriguez: It's got an interesting premise: take old, used postcards and give them to comic writers and artists for them to make a story around. The stories were, for the most part, enjoyable and even the ones I didn't like as much weren't bad per se, just not to my taste.

I do, however, wish that the introduction to each story hadn't been included because every single one told me what Jason Rodriguez thought the story would be when he gave away the postcard and then what the story that got written was about. And, okay, I want to be able to suss out what the story's about for myself, not be told that it's about the power of love and redemption, because it may not be about that for me. But, other than my annoyance at being told how to interpret the stories by the introductions, it was an interesting little graphic novel.

Time Travelers Strictly Cash, by Spider Robinson: I bought this book because I'd heard good things about Robinson's Callahan's Crosstime Saloon series and thought this was a collection of short stories from that series. (The back cover made it sound that way.) Turns out that only a third of the stories are, another third are unrelated science fiction short stories, and the last third consists of various non-fiction writings of his.

Despite looking at the back cover suspiciously once I realized what the actual contents were, it was a good book. The Callahan's stories were fun to read, and I always love a good (or bad, depending on how you look at it, I suppose) pun. The other science fiction stories were also good. I particularly enjoyed "Soul Search," which dealt with cryogenics and reincarnation. The non-fiction was...eh. Didn't hate it, could have easily lived with never having read "Rah Rah R.A.H." (Robinson's essay on why Robert A. Heinlein is the bestest), but I've also read more boring things and at least these were short.

The Subtle Knife, by Philip Pullman: This took forever to read due to losing it in my mom's car of all places for six months. (It drove me batty during those months too because I knew I owned the book and yet it wasn't anywhere in the house.) Anyway, about the book, I can now see why people decided the series has an anti-Christianity message. (I still think the people kicking up a fuss about said message are rather silly, but anyway.) I'm holding out on making any judgements about Pullman's big message until I read The Amber Spyglass because right now it looks too obvious where Pullman wants to go. And I'm hoping The Amber Spyglass is subtler than that.
coprime: an awesome lady stepping out of a boat (Default)
Saturday, January 29th, 2005 11:30 pm
My mom is making gumbo, and it smells really good. I want some now, but it's not ready. And I'm hiding in my room at the moment.

So I read comics now. Authority Revolution 04, Cable & Deadpool 11, Green Arrow v3 46, Justice League Unlimited 05, Legends of the Dark Knight 187, Legion of Super-Heroes v5 02, Madrox 05, Nightwing 101-102 , Robin 134, Teen Titans Go! 15, Teen Titans v3 20, and Ultimate Fantastic Four 15, specifically.

Comic ramblings behind here. )

And I watch cartoons. The new Teen Titans and Justice League Unlimited.

Toon ramblings behind here. )

...Yeah. Me != deep.
coprime: an awesome lady stepping out of a boat (Default)
Saturday, January 22nd, 2005 04:01 pm
I am at work. Work = time to read comics. Time to read comics means time for commentary. Because I like to.

LSH v4 #021, Ultimate Fantastic Four #01-14 )

And on a completely unrelated note, it is very hard to convince Yanks to eat king cake. ::le sigh:: I am constantly appalled at the foods Northerners deem good. (Okay, not appalled. But they definitely need some help adding spice to stuff.)
coprime: an awesome lady stepping out of a boat (Default)
Sunday, January 16th, 2005 02:27 am
So while LJ's been down, I dove into Legion of Super-Heroes v4. And... you all get the running commentary. I'm rather shaky on who's who and what's what, so expect a lot of "Um, huh? What's happening?" Don't expect anything deep. ::snicker:: Now, don't you feel lucky?

LSH v4 #001-020 )